When It Floods – Endometriosis & Heavy Flow

Big girls wear diapers too.


My girls talk a lot about diapers, my little one is potty training herself. No, really, she woke up one day thia6 week and declared that she was a big girl who didn’t need to wear diapers.  So she graduated to knickers when we are home, this isn’t without accidents and a love-hate relationship with the potty. But, the bottom line remains, diapers are for little girls.


One of the things that I loathed about my periods was that I always received the el-nino version, complete with hail stones, also known as the clots. It was heavy, messy and destructive. It had me longing to stay indoors, to stay tucked in bed, except, it stormed in bed too, and sheets aren’t woven to absorb the red sea. 


I’ve legit thrown away some garments before. I made the grande error of washing off – more like, attempting to wash off – a blood stain with hot water. It bonded. The red carved a home in the threads and refused to leave. I’ve been terribly embarrassed by my periods. Had my self esteem plummet during my periods. I couldn’t trust my uterus not to let me down. The flow sometimes felt like a breast-milk let down, urgent, forceful and absolutely beyond my control. 


I’ve layered and improvised to try to contain the flow. I’ve set reminders to wake up and turn during the night, because the pad just wasn’t loyal. Even layering the pads was not effective in holding back the red sea.

An endo-sister recently shared with me that the one thing she wished that she knew is that adult diapers were an option. 
I never thought of them as an option, in fact, I always considered maternity pads the next best thing. I think it’s a brilliant idea. A lifesaver, and self esteem redeemer.


Big girls wear diapers too. 

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A Conversation About Menstruation – MHDay2018

When we take away the shame that surrounds menstruation, girls and women will truly be able to walk in freedom.

Being born with a uterus should not be a disadvantage. Being born with a uterus should not stagnate your dreams. Being born with a uterus should not make you spend time away from school or work every month.

To commemorate Menstrual Hygiene day 2018, We For She organized an event at Ronald Ngala Primary School in Mombasa.

It was nice to see boys and girls eager to learn more about menstrual hygiene. A conversation about menstruation is one that we need to have with people of both genders. Menstruation is not optional, menstrual hygiene and health education should be prioritized.

I was invited to speak about menstrual health education and endometriosis. It was good to create awareness about endometriosis even to preteens. I urged the stakeholders present to offer comprehensive menstrual health education to the girls, including stressing the importance of understanding your hormonal functions and how to decipher your periods.

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The Mombasa County Women Representative Hon Asha Mohamed took the microphone and shared her journey with Endometriosis. Her vulnerability and willingness to share her journey was beautiful. We may be one in ten women, but we are more than just a statistic. We are mothers, sisters, wives, cousins, and friends to many other men and women. Our voices matter.

I applaud you Hon Asha Mohamed. Thank you for standing with us and for amplifying our voice.

Tina Leslie of Freeedom4girls shared about period poverty. The reusable menstrual products are a great alternative for girls and women who miss school and work because of lack of sanitary products. Also, these products are environmentally friendly.

The theme of this year’s Menstrual Hygiene days was #NoMoreLimits. Here’s to girls and women achieving their dreams and living their lives to the fullest.

 

 

Endo Prayer: When I Feel Overwhelmed

There’s a dark valley that the Endo journey plummeted me into. In that space, I have struggled to keep hope alive, stay positive and pray.

I’m not where I used to be, but because I know no-one is immune to the darkness and the feelings and thoughts that come when in that place, I will be writing Endo-prayers, little prayers that you can whisper when you feel like an assortment of emotions.

Some days have been harder than others, but there in the darkness, I have seen a glimmer of light and hope. I know that even in the difficult moments, God is there.

Here is the first prayer:

Dear God,

I thank you because you formed me in my mama’s womb. There is no part of me that you do not know. You see all of my organs and see where the Endo cells have carved out a home.

I feel overwhelmed, and sometimes so helpless because I’m struggling to understand your plan in this place of pain. I desperately long to see Your face in this phase, but It’s hard to focus when my tears are all I see.

Please comfort me and ease the pain. Remind me of your love for me.

In Jesus name I pray and believe,

Amen

Blessings!

If you need to talk, or a sounding board, you can send me an email via yellowendoflower@gmail.com

5 Ways You Can Support An EndoWarrior

Endometriosis affects 1 in 10 women. This means, if you know 10 women, you know Endometriosis.

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The fact that it’s an invisible disease makes it difficult for women to get diagnosis and for people to relate with her and the pain. Because of the nature of the disease, and the societal norms, women find it hard to speak about Endo and even reach out for help.

It is more than just a woman’s disease, it affects the society as a whole. Women, daughters and sisters are affected. Fathers, husbands and brothers too.

5 Ways Tolove on an ENDOWARRIOR

Here are a few ways that you can support a woman who has Endometriosis:

  1. Believe Her

When she says that she is in pain, believe her. When she struggles to get out of bed, believe her. When she is too inflamed and bloated to fit in her normal clothes, and takes very long to get ready, believe her. When she says sex hurts too much, believe her. When she says she’d love to meet up but she just can’t, believe her. When she says she is on the verge of giving up hope, believe her.

Believe her. Believe her. Believe her.

The best form of love and understanding stems from a place of believing without a shadow of doubt that she is in pain and not pretending.

This understanding will help you be sensitive when you ask her questions and comment on her daily struggle.

2. Listen to Her

Hear her out, don’t dismiss her pain. Listen to her dreams, her fears, her jokes and her heart. Listen to her words and also to her actions; gently encourage her when she sinks into the valley of sadness.

3. Do Your Research

Take a personal interest in the condition and seek to be knowledgeable. There is a lot of valuable information on the internet. Read up about Endo, go onto forums and ask questions. Read the leaflets that come with the medicine that she is on. Research on

4. Be Present

Let her know that you are in this together. Go for the consultations together. Take an interest in her daily routine, encourage her to do things that help her. If she goes on the Endo diet, help her plan her meals. Join her in some of the meals.

5. Love her as she is

Don’t try to change her to be the woman you remember her being or the woman of your dreams. Love her as she is. Accept the challenges that she faces and help her work around them. Speak words of life and love.

Your support means a lot.

Blessings,

Ess

The Diary Of A Kenyan Endo Warrior: Period Shaming

 

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Dear Diary,

My heart is heavy. Thinking about my periods as a teenager has brought tears to my eyes. When my periods became painful I heard all manner of comments from other women about how I should suck it up and put my brave face on. “No one needs to know you are on your period. Every woman has a period, you are not the first to have one and you surely won’t be the last”. These are words I heard so many times, and each time they pierced my heart.

I learned to put my brave face on and suck it up. Sometimes the pain was so severe that I couldn’t sit in class. The school nurse was not of much help. She quickly drew an image of the female reproductive system, explained that periods were normal and so was the pain, as she gave me two paracetamols.

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I remember those pills were so hard to swallow, I always said a prayer as I swallowed them. Sometimes she wouldn’t let me rest, because I’d become a ‘repeat offender’, a regular in her office every month. Yet, I never prayed for a painful period. After all, who likes to be sick anyway? I dislike being sick. I felt guilty for being sick, ashamed to be a woman. Sad that I was ‘that’ girl, the one with the problematic period.

Every woman gets periods but not every woman has Endometriosis. Just because your period is painless, doesn’t negate another woman’s painful experience.

Over the years, I grew tired of pretending to be okay when my uterus was collaborating with other organs to kill me slowly. I wore a brave face, while all along, I was dying slowly.

The thing that I wish all women knew is:  Just because your period is painless, doesn’t negate another woman’s painful experience. We need to stop period shaming, and talk about periods openly.

Painful. Periods. Are. Not. Normal!

Love always,

Ess

Calling All Endo Warriors in +254

March is Endometriosis Awareness Month. This March, we have an opportunity to wear a touch of yellow daily and share something with our circles about Endometriosis. The information we share could change a girls life and save her from living in shame and silence.

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Let us make this invisible disease, visible and audible. Talk, post and tweet about Endometriosis. Dispel the myths about Endo and help other women know that the pain is not all in their heads and they are not alone.

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The Endometriosis Foundation of Kenya is hosting a high tea for Endo warriors in Kenya. This is a good opportunity to come meet other Endo warriors, and hear exactly what the EFK is, what they plan to do and how you can plug in.

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As always, if you would like to share your Endo story to encourage other women living with Endometriosis in Kenya, please send me an email via yellowendoflower@gmail.com and I will be in touch.

Blessings,

Ess

#TheKenyanEndoStory: Elsie Wandera

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The second Kenyan Endo warrior sharing her story with us is Elsie Wandera. Hers is a story of pain, hope and sisterhood. After struggling to get a diagnosis, she vowed to help other women know that they do not have to suffer in silence, and they do not have to walk alone. She is the founder of the Endometriosis Foundation of Kenya.

 

My name is Elsie Wandera and I am 36yrs old. I am a trained Journalist & recently graduated with a degree in Communication – Advertising major from Daystar University. I have experience in Personal Administration and I’ve worked in a marketing capacity for 2 FMCGs. I am also the founder of Endometriosis Foundation of Kenya focusing on raising awareness and advocacy on Endometriosis. I am also the founder of My Heart Scripted where we run a 10-week experience called Purity & Purpose, that helps women pursue purity and unlock purpose.

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The thing that makes me smile is knowing that I have played my part in making the world a better place and seeing other people smile thus.

 

Where it all begun

I started my periods when I was in primary school. I sincerely thought I was dying and I remember I was in the shower crying because I could see this brownish flow that I could not tell where it was coming from. My mom then told me it was okay and I remember I had to buy pads and that was exciting as a girl. I even remember how they smelt then 🙂

 

Managing the pain

The pain begun when I was in high school around the age of 14 or 15. I remember I experienced such bad pain that I had to be in the clinic during the days. I also know that these were formational years for me because I thought there was something wrong with me. I continued the journey with the knowledge that periods are painful and I dreaded the days.

 

Diagnosis and treatment

I was finally diagnosed with Endometriosis in 2006 through a laparoscopic procedure and the only way to simplify it for me the Obs/Gyn told me that my uterus was growing inside out. He found a chocolate ovarian cyst that was bleeding and it was by God’s grace that he found it because it was one of the things that contributed to the pain.

 

Upon diagnosis, I was put on a hormonal therapy treatment. This was administered subcutaneously every 28 days below the navel line for 6 months. It had the worst side-effects for me among them headaches, hot flashes, breast tenderness, nausea & vaginal dryness. Once I completed the dose the effects of endometriosis which include, chronic pelvic pain, painful bowel movement, painful sex & heavy bleeding became worse. I recall lying in an ER calling my Obs/Gyn and asking him amidst tears why it is back. That was when he revealed that it has no known cure and is recurring in nature. What’s interesting is that he requested me to consider getting pregnant soon (I was 26 then) because one of the effects it contributes to infertility among women. However, this is not a solution but a Band-Aid for 9-months that does not guarantee that the condition will not relapse.

 

At 34, I had to go through another laparoscopic procedure where the they removed another ovarian cyst and the adhesions around my uterus. This was interesting because I did not know that surgeons had specific parts of the body they could cut and others they could not.file

 

Endometriosis has affected many aspects of my life 

The condition caused physical pain and as a result I dreaded my period and yet it is a gift from God that should be enjoyed by any woman. I had difficulty going for long calls and it was the worst feeling – worse than constipation. I also had very painful ovulation and I know sometimes I called it “the egg-is-moving day.” I was also dependent on pain medication and anticipated pain every month which is not the way any woman should live their life. I also stopped eating as the period approached due to the nausea and difficulty passing long and short calls.

 

Emotionally it was draining because I had negative thoughts and more importantly, because of the research around the condition and what one doctor told me, I knew I would never conceive. At some point I thought it was God punishing me for a life I’d lived carelessly before.

 

Socially I was always uncomfortable because I needed to explain myself and why I was going through crippling pain. I was conscious and limited in dressing comfortably because for me it meant sagging clothes because of the physical discomfort during my period and the heavy flow…God forbid I’d stain a seat when the flow opened after a bubble escaped…messy days.

 

Professionally, I dreaded having to explain my colleagues and leaders that once every month I’d be disabled and sometimes unable to come to the office. It’s interesting that on those days people would still expect me to deliver my tasks and it would seem like it is not as serious as other physical ailments. But over all I never had an issue especially after I learned what the condition was and that it had a name.

 

I have made changes in my lifestyle

The biggest changes I had to make are around diet and physical exercise because I understood the disease and what it would require of me. I cut down on gluten, wheat, dairy and red meats and increased intake of greens, super foods & supplements to ensure I was enriching my nutritional value. Water intake also is my highest priority because it is a natural cleanser.

 

My current challenges

I think sticking to the diet and relapsing to eating unhealthy foods is the greatest struggle. I’ve learned my body enough to know when I’m craving foods I try to compensate with a healthy choice.

 

Learnings from the journey and words of wisdom to other women suffering

I think my greatest learning was understanding that my body is different from another woman and I have to prioritize my health, because no one else will if I neglect it’s cry.

 

We also need support from the world and by telling my story I’ve encouraged another woman know she is not alone. Therefore, tell your family and friends once you are diagnosed and stop self-medicating and seek professional advise because the body was not built to constantly rely on medication. We also need support from government, employers and medical industry for the sake of all the women in finding a cure and supporting them in every way we can because it takes away our most reproductive years of our lives which we cannot relive.

 

Endo changed  my life

I believe out of the pain this journey my life changed and I chose to speak up about this condition which many women suffer in silence because most think it’s shameful to speak about.

 

Also leading the movement reminds me that I’ve got followers who desire to be resorted as I was and therefore it is ensuring that they have a reference point and encouragement as they journey.

 

Finally, to the world:

Every woman’s pain is valid and if doesn’t matter that you don’t understand it matters that you stand with her as it is not easy to bear.

carnations

I love carnations 🙂

You can connect with Elsie on Facebook and join The Endometriosis Foundation of Kenya  Facebook group.

Follow her on Instagram and Twitter.

Thank you Elsie for sharing your story with us. You are a star!! ❤

If you would like to be featured in #TheKenyanEndoStory, please send an email to yellowendoflower@gmail.com and I will be in touch.

Blessings,

Ess

Endo Pain Management Tips

Endometriosis is unique. Two women can suffer from Endometriosis but exhibit different symptoms and experience different levels of pain. What is universal though is, Endo sucks. I’m yet to meet a woman who thinks having Endometriosis is plain exciting and exhilarating. If anything, it takes out the light from aspects of life. Pain has a way of dulling experiences.

Different things work for different people. You may have to try different things before you find what works, but when you do, hang on to it with all you’ve got.

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For me, ingesting Apple Cider Vinegar was a life saver. Literally. The pain levels went from unbearable ‘I’m.dying’ to a cramp here and there. Praise be to God (do I hear an Amen?)

Here are a few Endo pain management tips courtesy of Patty’s Beauty World that you can try out.

*A hot bath with 2 cups of Epsom salts mixed in, they also sell lavender Epsom salts.

* A heating pad.

*Gluten free probiotics daily and keep them in fridge, no dairy, red meat, soy, gluten and flaxseed.

*A book by Julie daniluk is good lots of recipes , book is called meals that heal inflammation.

*A tens machine can help pain, buy it at some pharmacies or on amazon, got mine for $35 on amazon.

*Castor oil soaked in a small all cotton towel, then squeeze out excess oil and place on your tummy. Then place a plastic bag on top of towel, then place a heating pad. Leave on for one hour lying down relaxing. Repeat 3x week and everyday on your period, it will help with pain, indigestion, bloating. The more you do it the better it works over time.

*Light exercise like yoga or pilates. Light stretching, yoga and pilates.

*Also I drink almond milk 35 calories instead . Peppermint tea, lavender tea, chamomile tea helps, dandelion or dandelion root tea and chai tea.

*Visanne is an endo drug that has helped a lot of women.

*Acupuncture can also help alleviate pain too.

*Ginger capsules 250mg 4x a day, Helps with cramps and nausea and it’s all natural. Also turmeric capsules daily helps with inflammation and pain. To add taste to your tea use manuka honey if available.

*Melatonin 20mg at bed will help you sleep and it is all natural. The body produces melatonin but some do not produce enough, so these pills really work great and they are all natural.

*Lavender essential oil is good to calm you and help with pain. Rub a few drops on your tummy to ease pain, and if you have a headache rub a couple of drops on your forehead. Also a drop of essential oil lavender on each temple. You can even smell it a little to calm you down.

Have you tried something that has worked for you and you’d like to share with other ladies? Please send me an email yellowendoflower@gmail.com and I’ll post it.

All the best. I pray that you find something that works and healing all around.

Blessings upon blessings,

Ess

When Sex Hurts #TheKenyanEndoStory

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Sex is supposed to be synonymous with pleasure. Sometimes, it is not, and pain takes the place of pleasure. Over time, it is possible for this to strain a marriage. One of the symptoms of Endometriosis is pain during or after sex.

Pain during sex is seldom talked about and many women and marriages are suffering in silence. In honor of Endometriosis Awareness Month earlier this year, I asked Maggie Gitu, a Marriage and Family Therapist and Sex therapist to expound on what to do when sex hurts because of endometriosis or adenomyosis.

courtesy ofhttp://signaturextra.com/5-medical-conditions-ways-to-deal-with-painful-sx

Sex is one of the most important and fun ways for married couples to connect. Painful sex, however, is no one’s idea of a good time. Painful sexual intercouse, also known as dyspareunia, is the persistent pain that occurs during or after sexual intercourse. Dyspareunia can occur as a result of a variety of issues such as insufficient lubrication, trauma, surgery or physical conditions such as vaginismus, endometriosis or adenomyosis. Endometriosis is caused when tissue that lines the uterus grows outside of the uterus, while adenomyosis happens when uterine tissue grown into the uterine wall. Both of these conditions can interfere with sexual intercourse.

While the presence of endometriosis or adenomyosis can interfere with a couple’s sexual pleasure, there is no need for sexual intimacy to cease altogether. So what’s a couple to do?

Communicate:

It may sound cliché but it’s absolutely true. It’s important for a couple to communicate openly and honestly about what is happening in their marital bed. Even going for doctor visits together would be helpful in allowing male partners to hear the information directly from a qualified medical professional, which may increase their understanding and empathy for their female partners.

It is also important to allow room in the marriage for honesty: room to speak honestly about the challenges of having to deal with a condition, irritation at having to avoid certain sexual positions that you would want to try but can’t because of the pain to the partner, the guilt or shame that is common with partners who feel like they are being denied the sexual adventures they imagined they would have. Remember that these feelings are about the situation, not the person. The bottom line is that openness and honesty will be crucial if a couple is to enjoy their sex life.

Lose It:

Lose the guilt, because none of this is your fault, and even when/where you could have done better, now you can because now you know better. Lose the blame; again, this serves no purpose in enhancing the intimacy in your marriage. Accept that this is the situation that you’re in, find a competent doctor to work with you and move forward determined to enjoy your sex life together, inspite of a diagnosis of endometriosis/adenomyosis. Lose the bad attitude; it’s going to destroy your sex life, which will in turn negatively impact other aspects of your marriage. Lose anything and everything that will interfere with your ability to connect as a couple. If you need more support, more information, or additional medical intervention, all you ever have to do is ask, so ask! Your doctor will advise you on all the options that are available. Lose the pressure to be perfect; sex is about connection, intimacy and fun not an Olympic performance with a score board. Relax into it; remember that you are not alone, and there is help and support to be found for those who take the time to seek. 

Attitude:

When it comes to sex, attitude is everything. Even without the added challenges of endometriosis or adenomyosis, the attitude a couple has about the kind of sex they want to have really does make all the difference. Instead of seeing these conditions in a strictly negative light, try to challenge yourselves on all the positive things that can come out of this, for example, the sexual positions that you hadn’t even thought to try might be exactly what you need in order to have sex life that you want.

Experiment and Have Fun:

Sex should be fun, so make it fun and experiment. As a couple, be open to different sexual positions, for example, while the missionary position may be painful for some women, it may be easier for you but you’ll never know unless you try. In addition, begin to figure out what sequences work best and which ones are best left alone e.g. some women find it easier to begin with one sexual position and then move on to other positions while some find that maintaining a single position is easiest on them. The point is, experiment! Make a game of it by coming up with a funny ranking system that you can both look forward to contributing to; be sure to add an exciting reward system 😉

Part of experimentation is understanding that sexual intercourse is not the only way to enjoy sexual intimacy. In other words, what are your sexual limits? What are you willing to try, even once? Developing your own sexual ‘playlist’ as you seek to increase your repertoire can be a fun way to take the pressure off by focusing on what feels good, not what ‘should’ feel good. With the right attitude, the issue may no longer be what the couple can’t do but instead be all the things they haven’t – yet. The sexual repertoire is endless so experiment and find out what works best for you.

A happy healthy sex life is vital for any couple and despite having a diagnosis of endometriosis/adenomyosis, it is achievable with communication, the right attitude and a sense of fun.

If you would like get in touch with Maggie, you can reach her via maggiegitu@hotmail.com, +254 734 757 785 or @MaggietheMezzo .

I initially shared this post on my other blog Bibi2be.com

Pain during sex affects a woman and her relationship. My heart has had a burden for women who are going through a hard time in this area. This August, I will be hosting an event to support women who have struggled with pain during sex and the emotional turmoil that it comes with.

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If you are a woman living with Endometriosis in Kenya who would be interested in talking about pain during sex more candidly with a small group of women facing the same challenge and a counselor, please send me an email via yellowendoflower@gmail.com and I’ll send you more details. Due to the nature of the conversation, the sessions will be very small.

Blessings,

Ess

#TheKenyanEndoStory : Nurah Palesa

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The first Kenyan Endo warrior sharing her story with us is Nurah Palesa. Hers is a story of pain, despair, strength, courage and hope.

Before I turned 10, the year that pain became the filter to which I would see life, I was eagerly awaiting my periods. I looked forward to it like a boy would await his ceremonial rites of passage. I wanted to see the drops of blood on my underwear and have a crazy happy dance celebrating my new life as a woman.

 

I am Queen Nurah, and at the age of 25 I have lived with Endometriosis for 15 years now. I run on happiness. There is no one thing that makes me happy, a combination of the things that pull my heart strings is how I live. As for my profession, let’s just say that I am a Storyteller and Poet.

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Where it all begun

 

The pain begun immediately I started my periods. I was sitting in the back of the class, talking as usual and ignoring what the teacher was writing on the board. Then my insides were attacking me. It felt like someone had run a knife across my abdomen over and over again. I shakily put up my hand and asked if I could go to the bathroom.

When I got into the cubicle, something told me to check my underwear and hoorah I had blood. But I couldn’t do the crazy happy dance, not with the pain that I was feeling.

I remember going to one of the “nice” female teachers and telling her I got my period and that I was in intense pain. She was nice, she showed me how to put a pad on and for the pain she said that it was normal and hot water would help. “Normal? Are you crazy, I feel like I’m dying!” I thought to myself as I gave her a look that showed I thought she was crazy.

Maybe two hours later, I don’t exactly remember, my mother was called because now I was wailing and “causing a scene”. Hehehe, causing a scene.

At the end of the day my mom gave me Syndol. Yep Syndol. That confirmed my suspicion that the pain I had was not normal and for the next 7 days I suffered.

 

Managing the pain

For 13 years I was subjected to excruciating pain before my periods, during my periods and 3 days after my periods. In total I was in pain 15 days out of the month.

I ended up having a cocktail of painkillers in my bags. Here is the list with what I started to what I take now:

  • Syndol (4-6 pills in an hour/day)
  • Betapyn (5-6)
  • Postan (10)
  • Brufen (10)
  • Buscopan (10-12)
  • Buscopan plus (it would land in my stomach and I would throw up immediately)
  • iBoprufen (40 mg 6, 80mg 7-8)
  • Vykadin (6)
  • And now I’m on tramadol 100mg and when the pain gets really bad I go for the shot.

And while I was on these pain meds I sometimes found that mixing them would help. And when I say help, I mean level the pain to a degree that I could function and not snap at people.

The pain haze of life is amazing. It changes how you look at everything and how you react. Physical pain makes life 300 times worse. Well for me. Someone else could be different.

I had the worst mood swings, had a short fuse and basically I would just want to cry and be alone most of the time. I am generally a nice, gentle happy Queen, but you don’t want to make me mad when I am in pain.

Oh wait, did I forgot to mention that I would get high off the pain meds… lol aaaand that I was a heavy alcohol drinker. For 7 good years.

The combination of alcohol and a cocktail of pain meds made the pain bearable.

I remember when I joined uni and my girlfriends would watch me pack my clutch bag with tampons and meds (3 strips of 10 so basically 30 pills) and they would ask if I was ok. Little did they know that I would have gone through 2 of the strips by midnight.

I would literally get high just to escape the pain.

When I was 22, fresh out of rehab (because others thought that alcohol was the problem) the pain kicked up a notch.

 

Finally, I got a diagnosis

 

Lower back pain and shoulder pain had kicked in, and I needed to know that there was a name for what I was going through. I went to see a gynaecologist and he diagnosed me with Endometriosis. I thought that finally I can get rid of the pain for good now that it’s an actual disease.

I went online and decided to learn all I could about my condition. That’s the type of person I am, I read and research on topics that are of interest to me. So I did what I do best; gather intel.

I found out that foods (which I had always known, I’m very strict with what I eat.) contributed to the pain levels and there was a diet I could start.

Eh….that diet did not work. In fact I ended up increasing my pain and losing even more weight.As for the endo diet, which is vegetarian I really tried… My body just didn’t accept it.. And recently I discovered that diets don’t work for everyone,  our blood types play a big role in the foods we need and as an O+ I need meat.. (Sticking to white)
So again I run around for another year looking for a solution and I found one. Or so I thought.

I went through a Laparoscopy where The Gynaecologist lasered the extra endometrium tissue that covered my ovaries and fallopian tubes and he put a Mirena Coil so that my fertility wouldn’t be compromised. (I had stage 4 of Endo at this point)

 

Relief at last

 

For the first time in 13 years I had no pain.

I loved my life; a zeal for it (which I still have) was born. You know when someone tells you to live life to the fullest and do what you want to do and wave your hands in the air like you don’t care?? Lol, yeah I did that for 3 good months before the pain came back.

 

Back to reality

 

As I write this I have the worst headache ever and my back and shoulders have decided to kick into level 400. The last two days have been brutal because I am ovulating and I can feel the damn egg travelling.

I could change my diet again or find some radical something that will help “ease or get rid of” the pain, maybe even look at the spiritual aspects of it, but my reality is that I am meant to have this pain. I’m just supposed to rise above it and live life to the fullest and that’s not an easy task.

Yoga helps me. And meditation. And maybe some teas here and there. Lemon, ginger and honey is amazing. I generally try and avoid junk and fast foods and sodas… Been on a general healthy diet from the word go.. My moms always been conscious about food.

 

Endo and Family

 

My family is very open with each other; my mom and sister also have endo and my brother was told early on about our periods.
The extended family is a whole different story. I like avoiding them as they disturb my positive energy fields.

I would love a whole football team of children lol.. 

Endo is genetic, my mom and I traced it back to her grandmother(Her dads mom)  so for me it doesn’t really matter if I have a daughter or son,  I’m going to have to tell them asap about endo.. And what they can do from the word go.

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Parting Shot

 

To my queens and princesses I agree it is soo not fair that we endure this pain.

Search for your solutions and remedies. Don’t let anyone stop you. 

However do not forget to live life to the fullest. Do what makes you happy; love yourself and play in the rain.

Oh and please be kind to your sister queen/princess.

Seriously, we women can be brutal to each other and it’s about time we stopped.

The black rose is my favourite flower.

You can check out Nurah’s blog here.

Follow her on Twitter and Instagram.

Thank you Nurah for sharing your story with us. You are a star!! ❤

If you would like to be featured in #TheKenyanEndoStory, please send an email to yellowendoflower@gmail.com and I will be in touch.

Blessings,

Ess